Tag: Xi Jinping

Hong Kong, America Stands With You

Spencer Kellogg | @Spencer_Kellogg

Flashpoint

To the residents of Hong Kong: if you can hear us, we stand with you. In the airport, and in the streets, to those millions of you who are beating that eternal drum of freedom, we stand with you. To the valiant protestors waving the American flag of liberty, we are with you. To those singing our national anthem through the dark night, we stand with you.

If there is one truth about the state of the modern American empire, it is this: We are not a singular people. From dusty plains to packed trains, and everywhere in between, we are a distinctively diverse population that rarely agrees in principle.

Continue reading “Hong Kong, America Stands With You”

Advertisements

How China Overtook the USA Where The USSR Couldn’t

Daniel Szewc | Poland

There are multiple reasons why China, a country which had to endure the dictatorship of a communist even worse than Stalin, Zedong Mao, managed to lift itself from the ashes, whilst Soviet Russia couldn’t do it.

Geography

To get the elephant out of the room, the only variable that is inherently more favorable to China than it is for Russia is geography. After WW2, the USSR’s access to warm water ports was the best in all of Russia’s history, yet it is undeniable that there was a muzzle on the bear. The Greenland-Iceland-UK triangle in the North Atlantic, Bosphorus, and Dardanelle, and the Danish straits being controlled by NATO all stood in the USSR’s way. The American Navy, which stood ready to invade the Eastern Russia coastline, also prevented the USSR from having complete territorial control.

In contrast, the People’s Republic of China had a better situation- an underperforming India busy with Pakistan to the South East, impoverished people to the South, and devastated Japan to the West. This allowed the Revolutionary Army of China to concentrate less on defending its borders than the USSR had to.

Economy and Ideology

From the era of Xiaoping Deng seizing power in the Middle Kingdom, China was an active participant in the global market, since they accepted revisionist Marxist doctrines. In practice, they became communist in name only- the gray market was allowed to flourish, and redistribution was minimized, but the authoritarian control maintained. Gorbachev’s, Jaruzelski’s and Kohl’s “opening to the West”, meant a lack of accepting Western cultural demoralization and the slow economic shift to the left, that is still making its way to this day. China, on the other hand, became America and Europe’s supplier of goods, therefore a complete blockade of them would drastically lower the living standards in America and Europe, and cause Westerners to rise up against their governments. Extreme tariffs against goods produced in the USSR would have a minimal effect, simply because Americans did not prefer Soviet products, and the USSR’s products were unfit for American consumption.

To further explain in how much of an disadvantage China was originally, it is enough to say that they didn’t enjoy de facto home rule for the period of European colonisation, even though the Chinese emperor did de jure administer most of it’s territory- in comparison, the only era that could be remotely called “non-home rule” since the Dimitriadis (an era of Polish foreign rule in Russia during the early 17th century) was the Bolshevik rule- most of the party’s presidium was Jewish during that time, even though most people may not know it- Trotsky (Lev Davidovich Bronstein) and Lenin (Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov) for example, were the grandkids of Orthodox Jews and changed their surnames to aliases to hide their roots.

China’s line of attack based itself upon prior experiences that they have learned from- as Otto von Bismarck said: “Only a fool learns from his own mistakes. The wise man learns from the mistakes of others”


Get awesome merchandise. Help 71 Republic end the media oligarchy. Donate today to our Patreon, which you can find here. Thank you very much for your support!

Featured Image Source

US, Russia, and China Relations – Part 2

By Joshua D. Glawson | United States

US-China Relations: China has many trading partners; the US is the largest. As of recently, Trump has proposed possible tariffs to be added to imports from China into the US, which could hurt relations between the two. However, China does hold a significant amount of US Treasury debt, in fact they hold the most for outside of the US countries. This is to say that each of these countries has a significant financial incentive to maintain good relations, yet according to the Cato Institute, there is no formal Fair Trade Agreement between the two.

A Free Trade Agreement (FTA) is necessary between US and China in order to better relations and trades. This comprehensive set of rules will give confidence to business, especially in areas of intellectual property and technology transfer. China is notorious for not keeping strong regulations on Chinese companies infringing on copyrights and IP. The same FTA could be a good step forward with Russia as well, but many in the US are in fear of Russia becoming more powerful if that were to happen. Nevertheless, contrary to what some believe, free trade benefits the citizenry more than it would the governments’ political elite.

MIT stated, “In 2016 China exported $2.27T, making it the largest exporter in the world. During the last five years, the exports of China have increased at an annualized rate of 1.7%, from $2.04T in 2011 to $2.27T in 2016.” Whereas, “In 2016 China imported $1.23T, making it the 2nd largest importer in the world. During the last five years, the imports of China have decreased at an annualized rate of -2.8%, from $1.39T in 2011 to $1.23T in 2016. The most recent imports are led by Crude Petroleum which represents 8.25% of the total imports of China.” In 2016, the US imported from China around $436B in goods and exported around $122B in goods to China.

The Chinese have ramped up their militarization and continue to press forward into the South China Sea, against the wishes of the UN, the US, and other Western countries. Along with this growth of regional military presence, the US is equally showing a presence in the Sea as a means to attempt to thwart further possible aggression by the Chinese. So, economically, China and the US are tied together in a seemingly eternal marriage of trade, but when it comes to regional hegemony the two clash when it comes to determining who has legitimate authority and power.

This rising tension further perpetuates the idea that an FTA may help ease the stress between the two. Yet, China’s Communist President Xi Jinping has also pushed his Asian continental series of high-speed railways in what he has called “The One Belt, One Road, Initiative.” According to a report at Axios, this is still a part of the Chinese Navy’s military budget and growth, estimated anywhere between $4T and $8T, likened to a modern Silk Road.

Chinese-Russian Relations: China is Russia’s biggest source of import and export. As of 2016, Russia imported around $35.5B from China and exported nearly $30.3B to China. The two, although they share a border, have not had a longstanding good relationship, since the US has increased the US military presence in the Asian Pacific and along the waters of China and Russia, China and Russia have increased cooperation in military drills as a means to show comradery against the US hegemony.

Not only has US military presence irked Russia and China alike, but the US’ threats of tariffs on Chinese goods without an FTA could potentially lead to worsening relations between the US and China while strengthening those between China and Russia. Equally, the economic sanctions on Russia by the US, are probably inadvertently assisting the relations between China and Russia since China is now Russia’s biggest importer and exporter. If indeed it is verified on all levels that Russia mingled in the 2016 US Presidential elections, that could ensure severed ties between the US and Russia, providing more reason for Russia to join forces with China.

Both China and Russia have worked together in the past. Not only are they regionally close, but politically they are far more similar than the US is with either one of them. The Soviets joined China to fight against the Americans in both the Vietnam and Korean wars. The Chinese also joined the Americans to fight the Soviets in Afghanistan, showing the complexity of their relations.

Concluding Statements: The timidly fluid relations among the US, China, and Russia, has been economically lucrative while concurrently the escalating militarization of each of these States has brought the world to attention over the fear of a potential World War far more catastrophic than any in the past. While China is gaining economically, some of their exploitations of trade tariffs and their expansion of military may become their Achilles heel.

As for Russia, sanctions against them only help benefit the elite, while hurting the country overall. The best bet to ensure bettered relations between the US and Russia is by setting up a secure FTA. An FTA should also be established with China in order to maintain good economic and political relations between the US and China. It would then behoove Russia and China to follow suit. The ongoing lingering force of the US military around the world will surely be one of the US’ downfalls, as it blatantly instigates and infuriates countries all over, but it absolutely frustrates both Russia and China especially within their own regions.

The sure way to peace is the age-old tale of continuing in free trade, having Justice systems that provide equality under the law and cease the prowess of global military might or dominance. Countries that normalize positive trade relations between one another will find that the economic incentive is far more valuable than the harms caused by going to war with one another.

Likened to a parable, wars between butchers and candlestick makers leave the town with tarnished knives and a lack of light; but if the butcher and candlestick maker agree to trade instead of fight, their steel is strengthened and their lights shine brightest.


To support 71 Republic, please donate to our Patreon, which you can find here.

Featured Image Source.

China is Ready for War

By Owen Hemsoth | USA

In a recent address to the largest military force in the world, President Xi Jinping urged them to be ready for war and “do not fear death.”

A war in the east is a bigger possibility since the cold war and President Xi seems to be taking the initiative in having his military ready for that possibility. He should his military should “neither fear hardship nor death” during a visit this past Wednesday to the People’s Liberation Army’s (PLA) Central Theater Command according to Xinhua News Agency, the official state news station of China.

The news agency also mentioned a “bumpy journey” in trade with the US on Wednesday. An article published Wednesday said, “It is not surprising that a number of Chinese companies have hit the buffers in Washington as trade tensions between the two countries are flaring.”

President Xi’s quotes are potentially justified with this trade rift, uncertainty in Russia, and of course their neighbors North Korea.

Xi further said that his country needs to, “create an elite and powerful force that is always ready for the fight, capable of combat and sure to win in order to fulfill the tasks bestowed by the Party and the people in the new era.”

In a recent interview with Fox News, foreign affairs journalist and author Gordan Chang warned the US that if they were to strike first on North Korea, there is potential that China, Russia, and Iran would side with North Korea in what could be World War III.

This all comes after President Donald Trump’s controversial tweet reading “North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un just stated that the “Nuclear Button is on his desk at all times.” Will someone from his depleted and food starved regime please inform him that I too have a Nuclear Button, but it is a much bigger & more powerful one than his, and my Button works!”

China has the largest active military in the world, with over 2.3 million active members. Their budget is about $215.7 billion USD. They are also equipped with an estimated 260 nuclear warheads.

One thing is clear: Our leaders need to take a bit to learn about mutually assured destruction and the consequences should they push the “nuclear button.”

Trump, China, and the Basketball Players

By Harrison Lavelle | USA

Just a short while ago, UCLA announced the indefinite suspension of the 3 basketball players brought home by President Trump’s diplomacy after being accused and jailed on suspicions of shoplifting sunglasses from a Chinese Store. A few days earlier President Trump, who decided to plead the case of the Basketball players to the Chinese Government, convinced the Chinese President Xi-Jinping to release the Basketball players over the phone. The Players returned home safely the following day, after being released from a Hangzhou jail by Chinese Authorities, upon orders from the Chinese Government.

The Players returned home in the middle of controversy, and half the country was glad that the future NBA prospects had returned home. However, most of America, especially Trump voters, wanted to see the players indefinitely suspended from the Bruin’s Basketball team. President Trump doted on his effort, saying it took a lot to get them home. Countless Americans agree that the players were an embarrassment to the United States and to the School of UCLA for acting foolishly in a foreign country.

However, not all Americans were upset with the players’ actions. The star’s (LiAngelo Ball’s) father, LaVar Ball made countless statements in response to President Trump, calling Trump’s criticisms of his son’s actions unjust and rude. The President responded after taking LaVar’s comments as a sign of his un-gratefulness to what he (Trump) had done for LaVar’s son in China. The president responded by saying “I should have left them in jail!” to LaVar’s father.

I should have left them in Jail!

President Trump and the Basketball player’s have been feuding over the past few hours on Twitter, however eventually UCLA gave in to the criticisms of their players by most of America, and suspended them from the team indefinitely. They will not return to the UCLA team and have had their NBA prospects ruined by the suspension. The lesson they should take away from this entire venture, Don’t steal something that isn’t yours! and Be Grateful to those who try to help you out of sticky situations! Maybe if the players had thought of this they would be back home getting ready for an epic season of college basketball and a future NBA career, instead of lying at UCLA without a sport to play.