Tag: cryptocurrency investment advice

x42: The Cryptocurrency Gem You Don’t Want To Miss

By Spencer Kellogg | @Spencer_Kellogg

Open. Feeless. Infinite. Those are the three words that greet users of the x42 Protocol, a new cryptocurrency that launched in the late summer months of 2018. In the world of cryptocurrency, manufactured hype and speculation often cloud the true viability of new projects in the nascent marketplace. x42, however, appears to have all the trappings of a strong, working product for innovation and finance.

x42 is a decentralized cryptocurrency that promises zero fees and infinite scalability. The coin can be transferred privately in an instant and the platform itself acts as a creative authoring hub for launching an assortment of applications ranging from indie game developers to large-scale business models. Maintained by the blockchain, x42 provides a flexible entry for entrepreneurs and amateur content producers alike to create, maintain and execute smart contracts and customizable side blockchains.

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A technology based on the Stratis cryptocurrency, x42 smart contracts are written in the common language C# and provide builders with a framework to launch their own blockchain applications and projects. Utilizing the Breeze Wallet, x42 transactions are private and untraceable ensuring anonymity for core community users. The project is growing in interest every day and their Discord channel boasts over one thousand users already.

At this moment, the x42 team is focusing on releasing tiered nodes and an entry-level master node is available by purchasing and holding 1,000 coins in the x42 core wallet. x42 protocol employs Proof of Stake (POS) and rewards users who stake coins in the wallet with a payout every 1-3 days. x42 coins can be purchased at the Start-Ex cryptocurrency exchange.

Unlike many cryptocurrencies that utilized ICO’s during the crypto gold rush of 2017, the x42 team used a traditional launch that included a pre-mine of 25% of their full coin supply (42 million coins). The rest of the coin supply will be printed by the year 2030. This incentivizes users to hold their coins in a wallet and receive staking benefits. Block rewards are 20 coins per block until the block number 550,000 is reached (likely October of 2019) at which time the reward will reduce to 5 coins per block. For more information on coin supply and market cap, check out CoinGecko’s page for x42.

The use cases for x42 are impressive in their diversity. Developers have suggested that the platform can be used to create casual gaming infrastructures like Ethereum’s wildly popular CryptoKitties or to build more sophisticated tech like Maps or Virtual Reality applications. x42 can also be used to uphold contracts via a modeled reputation system or to even remotely control small and large-scale equipment for businesses.

x42’s combination of feeless, private transactions and a smart contract platform that can create and execute decentralized applications make it an interesting project to purchase and hold for the future. The team is active on several social media platforms and they have, so far, achieved every stated goal in a timely and professional manner. With less than 600 followers on Twitter, this is still very much the early stages for the x42 project and a good opportunity for speculators and tech-interested investors alike to join a budding project in its infancy.


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Buffet Says Cryptocurrency is a Gamble, Not Investing

By Mason Mohon | @mohonofficial

World-renown investor and head of Berkshire Hathaway Warren Buffet spoke out once again against cryptocurrency recently.

Ahead of the 2018 annual shareholders meeting for his organization, he told Yahoo! Finance:

You aren’t investing when you do that… You’re speculating. There’s nothing wrong with it. If you wanna gamble somebody else will come along and pay more money tomorrow, that’s one kind of game. That is not investing.

Buffet’s statements are much less fiery than the earlier statements of Charlie Munger, chairman of Berkshire Hathaway, who referred to bitcoin as a noxious poison.

I never considered for one second having anything to do with [bitcoin], I detested it the minute it had been raised. The more popular it got, the more I hated it. It’s just disgusting that people have been taken in by this.

Buffet continued that there are “two kinds of items that people buy and think they’re investing,” but “One really is investing and the other isn’t.” Buffet’s organization holds a lot of weight in the realm of finance, being one of the biggest investment organizations in the world.

Warren Buffet is the most famous popular investor, which means that his own statements also carry a lot of influence.

Many influential individuals have come out against various cryptocurrencies in much more visceral manners, making Buffet seem much more docile.


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Facebook Sued for Defamation Over Scam Cryptocurrency Ads

By Mason Mohon | @mohonofficial

United Kingdom financial advisor Martin Lewis is suing Facebook for defamation after cryptocurrency ads using his name and face continued to pop up on the site.

Lewis claims that his reputation and name were being used for fraudulent activities and fake cryptocurrency investment advice.

I will issue High Court proceedings against Facebook to try and stop all the disgusting repeated fake adverts from scammers it refuses to stop publishing with my picture, name, and reputation.

Facebook has reportedly published over 50 Martin Lewis advertisements. Ironically, Facebook banned cryptocurrency ads earlier this year, yet clearly to no avail.

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He has expressed disappointment in Facebook’s inactivity, making clear that removing these scammy adverts would be an easy fix.

Enough is enough. I’ve been fighting for over a year to stop Facebook letting scammers use my name and face to rip off vulnerable people – yet it continues. I feel sick each time I hear of another victim being conned because of trust they wrongly thought they were placing in me. One lady had over £100,000 taken from her.

Any ad with my picture or name in is without my permission. I’ve asked it not to publish them, or at least to check their legitimacy with me before publishing. This shouldn’t be difficult – after all, it’s a leader in face and text recognition. Yet it simply continues to repeatedly publish these adverts and then relies on me to report them, once the damage has been done.

The attorney leading the lawsuit stated:

Facebook is not above the law – it cannot hide outside the UK and think that it is untouchable.  Exemplary damages are being sought. This means we will ask the court to ensure they are substantial enough that Facebook can’t simply see paying out damages as just the ‘cost of business’ and carry on regardless. It needs to be shown that the price of causing misery is very high.

No, Cryptocurrency Is Not “Quietly Dying Out”

By Mason Mohon | @mohonofficial

On Sunday, Russia Today posted an article titled “Is the cryptocurrency market quietly dying out?”, which was full of nothing more than explanations of recent cryptocurrency events along with market declines.

The article merely discusses recent market trends but uses a loaded editorialized headline to make it seem like crypto is dying. The recent decline and widespread burns are quite the opposite, though. The market is organic, and consumers have to take responsibility and learn for themselves.
Those who were scammed or bought Bitcoin at $19,000 may be too depressed to ever buy cryptocurrency again, but if they are wise they will see it as a learning experience. People who have been burned will now use a skeptical eye when looking towards any potential investments.
The failure of the cryptos with “broken blockchains” is just creative destruction at work. They couldn’t serve the consumers, so a better and safer technology is coming to take their place.
A decline in the price of popular currencies is not the end of an era. It is a learning opportunity, so take advantage of it and use it as such.
Note: This is not investment advice.

The Banker’s Bitcoin: How Ripple is Against the Goal of Cryptocurrency

By Max Bibeau | USA

Cryptocurrency is a newly popularized method of transferring value. It prides itself primarily on three things: decentralization, security, and its lack of banking influence. However, while popular cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin (BTC) and Ethereum (ETH) check all of these boxes, Ripple (XRP) finds itself surprisingly lacking. As Ripple becomes a serious contender for the top spot based on market cap, we must fully recognize the many problems that Ripple is plagued with.

First, it’s important to note that Ripple is not decentralized. In fact, it was created and is owned by a 2012 startup by the name Ripple Labs. So the first thing we will look at in this article is decentralization. Cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin utilize the blockchain to allow pretty much anybody with a computer to run their own individual “node.” A node is, to put it simply, a copy of the ledger. Who has how much of the cryptocurrency? Whenever a transaction occurs, it is recorded on each node, and the ledger updates, changing the amount of cryptocurrency with everyone involved in the transaction. The more nodes running in the world, the more decentralized the network. As of the time of this writing, Bitcoin has 11,682 individual, independent nodes, making it impossible to hack or edit. As of July 2017, Ripple has only 55 nodes. Ripple has a shockingly low amount of nodes because the company Ripple Labs maintains a list of “validated nodes,” called the UNL (Unique Node List). In order to run your own node, Ripple must confirm your node, and add you to the programmed list. This means that there are far fewer nodes in existence, therefore offering less decentralization. If 28 of the 55 centralized nodes agree to change the ledger then they have full control over the distribution of the cryptocurrency. It is far easier to get 28 of 55 node runners to agree to a change, as opposed to 5,482 independent Bitcoin node runners.

Second, the security of the cryptocurrency leaves much to be desired. Researchers at Perdue University in 2016 decided to test the security of the network – and it has a major flaw. They found that within the technology, individual “verified nodes” are actually able to hold some of the cryptocurrency themselves, acting as virtual banks. Now first, this leaves a huge potential for hacking. If an individual node acting as a bank is hacked, the hackers essentially have full reign over one of Ripple’s banks. This could cause transactions to fail, and users to lose their funds. Another, more complex example was exposed by the researchers:

When we look at a security perspective, Moreno-Sanchez and team have established that small-sized networks could be potentially vulnerable to attacks, because the Ripple network always finds an alternative way to move a transaction via it’s network, even if one of the important “gateways” nodes is removed. So can this be secure? To test the transactions via small networks, the researchers performed a simulation, where they simulated the removal of important nodes in the Ripple network, similar to what a financial event leading to those circumstances would occur. The results of the simulation was that removing those nodes would isolate the amount of Ripples stored within them, if they are already on those nodes, since they become offline, but not lost forever. According to the researchers this may result in approximately 50,000 wallets to be vulnerable to a disruption and the XRP’s in them are also at risk.

So, Ripple’s centralization leaves it open to many potential security issues as well.

Finally, many (but notably not all) cryptocurrency users share a dislike of the banking world, and it’s influence over individual finances. However, Ripple is made for the banking world. The problem that Ripple is made to solve revolves around bank transfers – so we can’t exactly hold it against them that banks have begun to use their technology. It is concerning to many, however, that banks have begun playing a major part in Ripple’s success and price jumps. If you’re looking for a cryptocurrency made for individuals, Ripple may not be for you. Ripple does solve a real-world problem – but when looking at the centralization and security concerns, paired with the fact that Ripple has no concern for anonymity, it becomes clear that Ripple is a niche technology, perfect for big banks, but less than ideal for individuals buying into the future of monetary transfers.