Tag: false accusations

Man Sentenced to Prison for Rape With No Hard Evidence

Othman Mekhloufi | @othmanmekhloufi

On January 10th, 2019, a mostly female jury found Albert N. Wilson, a 23-year-old University of Kansas student, guilty of raping a woman he met at a nightclub near campus.

Douglas County District Judge Sally Pokorny sentenced him to 147 months (over twelve years) in prison.

On the night of September 10th, 2016, Mr. Wilson met his accuser at The Jayhawk Cafe nightclub, known as the Hawk. They were in line to get into the ‘Boom Boom Room’, a dark and crowded dance floor in the basement of the club.

At the time, Mr. Wilson was 20 years of age and used a friend’s ID to enter the nightclub. The accuser, a then 17-year old high school student, was not asked for identification by the club at all.

Continue reading “Man Sentenced to Prison for Rape With No Hard Evidence”

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Toxic Femininity Exists and Gillette Is Feeding It

Luke-David Boswell | United Kingdom

I’m a bit late to the party on the Gillette advertisement. But after watching the video, I learned that it sums up the current political climate; a small, vocal group of radical feminists are speaking without a clear understanding of men. I’ll forever stand by the belief that feminism is for the equality of both sexes. However, this increasing group of self-proclaimed social justice warriors receives constant media catering. In many cases, this is due to merely being brash and vocal against people who disagree and searching for ways to label society as oppressive.

I can agree that the motives of Gillette are brave. Nonetheless, the way they depict toxic masculinity (which I believe exists) is obviously stereotypical and against the popular opinion. For this reason, I cannot fathom how it got approval. If we’re going to discuss toxic masculinity and take out all our energy focusing on how men are apparently the devil, then we also have to talk about toxic femininity.

What Is Toxic Femininity?

Toxic femininity is noticed in passive aggression, person-to-person manipulation and systemic manipulation of victim complexes. A frequent talking about weight in women’s circles, female on female ‘slut shaming’, and using the status of a woman to ruin a man’s reputation are all evident. Ignoring that toxic femininity exists is detrimental to feminism’s own principles of equality. It is an issue we must recognize as much as toxic masculinity is attracting attention.

Toxic masculinity is not at all barbecuing, having a beard, playing sport, hunting, fishing or even laddish humor. Instead, we should recognize toxic masculinity for what it is. A harmful mental aspect of being a man and the pressure to assimilate into the regimented image of manliness is a key reason why many men feel like they don’t fit into current society.

Real Instances of Toxic Masculinity

Toxic masculinity is present in the objectification of women, violence, and the ‘boys will be boys’ mentality. It also appears in an inability to express emotions and in homophobia when men express non-masculine traits. Hugging a male friend, crying or struggling with mental illness may sometimes get the response of ‘man up’. as a man is often countered with ‘man up’. These issues are the true exemplifications of toxic masculinity. The issue is much more complex than the single narrative that many in the feminist movement focus on.

My main problem is the ad focused on how men need to improve themselves and become like Gillette suggests: the best they can be. Instead, we should also focus on how men need help overcoming the restrictions society has placed on them. Gillette, though, chose to generalize about men, further adding to a narrative of hatred.


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Actor and Comedian Aziz Ansari Represents Everyone Falsely Accused of Sexual Assult

By Benjamin Lemley | USA

Netflix star and stand-up comedian Aziz Ansari has recently come under fire for sexual assault allegations. The allegations come from an anonymous source who published her story on the website ‘Babe’. She recalls an encounter with Ansari where they went on a date then returned to his apartment. She said she felt pressured into sex, eventually performing oral sex. She said she went home and began to think of whether this was sexual assault or simply a bad date and sexual experience. She settled on the former.

Ansari responded in a statement by saying that he remembers the date, and saw nothing wrong with what happened. He said he was ‘surprised and concerned’ to hear that this woman felt otherwise.

Public reaction to these allegations has been mostly criticism of Babe and their source. People feel that the story, which is basically consistent from both accounts, doesn’t represent to them what sexual assault is. Ansari seemed to have no hints that what was happening was uncomfortable for his partner and it seems people have decided that it’s not his job to find those clues.

In a culture where sexual assault allegations are rampant, as is sexual assault itself, we as a society and as a country need to have very clear standards. When someone who has seemingly consented to sex or any sort, decides the next day that the encounter was uncomfortable, and as suck deems it assault, we must ask how that might feel for every actual rape victim out there.

Stories continue to pop up regarding Hollywood and sexual assault. Aziz Ansari is not the first and not the last to be accused. And in my opinion, the path towards reform consists of 2 main things. First, we need to make sure we have the right people. And second, when we know we do, let’s take legal action. Do those things and Hollywood, plus American, will be well on the way to effectively shaming and punishing sexual abusers.