Tag: neo nazis

Do Nazis Deserve Free Speech in America?

M. Buck | United States

There comes a point in political dissent where one might advocate for the erasure of someone else’s rights while relishing in their own. They might partition their speech as being worthy of liberal treatment. Meanwhile, they could see others as not deserving the same rights. If this sounds like a conundrum to you, you’re not alone.

To be specific about using social rights to try to erase those of others, take deplatforming on the Internet. One side uses the anonymity and liberality of the Internet to disenfranchise a group from their own (an Antifa member doxxing Nazis or vice versa, for example). One might conclude that the lack of consistency makes this unjust, but the notion is still worth looking at.

Free Speech and Violence

To start, we can analyze how deplatforming works and what it means. Antifa, a decentralized, militant organization of folks committed to ending fascism, understands how to doxx and deplatform effectively and rather stealthily. They infiltrate private groups of fascists and other far-right fringe groups, get them to reveal just enough personal information, and spread it online for all to see. They also engage in both offensive and defensive violence at rallies. Why are they doing this? What does it mean, and is it right?

The answer, as you’ll see, isn’t so clear-cut. Reading it plainly, you’ll see a double standard of who gets to talk and who doesn’t. This is expected, isn’t it? Really, any government will guarantee some compulsion in which citizens are forced to do something. It leads us to what underpins the entire argument of regulating free speech: is compulsion necessarily bad?

First of all, we could argue that compulsion is unjust because it goes against a natural sense of autonomy; the natural ability for someone to be free does not reconcile with force. Because of how natural autonomy is, it doesn’t make sense to coerce people into speaking “correctly”. After all, it will only lead to a damaged and unnatural state of mind. So, we let free speech exist absolutely.

But what about free speech existing for those who can monopolize it? For those who can use their free speech to occlude others from using theirs or do away with free speech entirely? Is seeking absolute free speech a good idea if it will end in recklessness sooner, rather than later?

Controlling Nazi Speech?

So, enters the argument for control. The people do not inherit goodness just naturally, they are molded that way. There is no natural state of autonomy because hierarchies exist naturally and we live under them. Thus, limiting free speech would create social cohesion so no group would have to question their existence in a state, thereby obstructing the government. (Note: this argument does rest on the assumption that certain people don’t know what’s good for them). 

But what about eventual questionings of the state? How would governments liquidate rebel political movements from influencing public opinion? Both arguments have their pitfalls, and one must evaluate these questions not to find an answer, but just to reach another conclusion.

To move back to the real world application, two violent groups who vehemently oppose each other are playing out the argument. Sure, it’s polarization, but one must remember that it is not banal. It is violently separating one group from the community and taking their ideologies out, with a knife or a cyber attack. Is this for good reason?

It’s not this article’s place to judge that. However, one must understand the brevity of the circumstances we are in currently and make just decisions. I encourage every reader to think and see for yourself.


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The Libertarian Party will Rise from Ashes of Intolerance

Within the last week, I have started college at a small liberal arts school located deep in the Virginia countryside. The demographics of this school worried me as they are overwhelmingly white and political stance is almost completely Republican. However, throughout my week and a half here, I have noticed that the freshman class that I belong to is part of the overall trend of a libertarian wave.

Intolerance Across the Spectrum

Through talking with my peers I have tried to gauge where they stand politically. In my dorm several classmates I have talked to have held firm mainstream Republican beliefs. However, after a discussion on Trump’s trade war, several of them wanted to know what my ideology was. After a brief discussion on what makes a libertarian, it is safe to say that they were somewhat hooked.

Another growing trend among young adults is an increasing embracement of the radical ends of the spectrum. For example, my roommate for this year identifies himself as a white nationalist. He believes in getting back to what he views as the roots of America. One might also call him a traditionalist, as he believes firmly in traditional gender roles. He also holds the segregationist belief in keeping people of different races apart. Of course, I personally don’t endorse his ideas, but I present them as an example of the growing trend of extremism in America.

The same thing exists on the left end of the spectrum, with the Black Power movement calling for just as bad of a power imbalance with black supremacy. This growing trend of extremism is dangerous. It often leaves those entering the political arena without a just banner to rally around. As the parties continue to drift off, compromise on key issues will keep waning. As a result, the hostility, intolerance, and vitriol that fills modern day politics will only worsen. After this toxic system sets in, there is no recourse, as America will have set its own lines of battle.

A Libertarian Future Awaits

This is why the third party vote matters. After partisanship slogs down the major parties, the third party vote will restore reason in America.

That being said, the Libertarian Party is unique, as it takes multiple forms. When America needs the third party vote desperately, the Libertarian Party will rise to the occasion. The party is very accepting of all types of people, ranging from strict believers in the Constitution to anarchists.

Ironically, what ties us together as a party is a belief in personal sovereignty. With these level-headed goals in mind, it is unthinkable that those rational people left in the middle of no man’s land will neglect a party that promotes freedom and equality. The party is the antidote of intolerance. The Libertarian Party has a bright future as more people flock to the ideals of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. 


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