Tag: Nihilism

Can The Joker Prove That Society is Meaningless?

Jack Parkos | @laissez_faire76

On April 3rd, Warner Brothers released the trailer for the new movie JOKER starring Joaquin Phoenix as the titular character. Fans are thrilled to have the Clown Prince of Crime back on the big screen and for good reason. The Joker is not just one of the most beloved villains in DC history, but in all of pop culture. Why is an insane criminal one of society’s most loved villains?

Continue reading “Can The Joker Prove That Society is Meaningless?”

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The Importance of the Individual in Life

By Nickolas Roberson | United States

The individual has been prominent throughout the entirety of human history, both in reality and mythology. In almost every instance of ancient culture, and even modern culture, there is the story of the hero facing the dragon. The hero isn’t represented by any group or collective, he represents Himself, the Individual. He is the culmination of domination and human will, the innate force to strive for achievement. This achievement could be happiness, freedom, or any other personal means. This hero’s goal is to slay the dragon and retrieve the lost gold or save the princess and kingdom. The dragon obviously represents evil, but what kind of evil? The answer is incredibly subjective. The abomination that is said dragon could be the collective that wishes to extinguish the flame of individuality, and it could very well be the flaws of human nature; in the Christian world, the dragon represents Satan, wickedness, or sin.

Ancient, archetypal stories that provide symbols and guidelines to living life beg the question: why is the individual important? Why should I, an ordinary human being, care about individuality? Without individuality, the core foundations of your life fall apart and your life loses its meaning. You become a lost soul without any personal guiding force in your life. Unfortunately, this has happened to quite a number of people in society today. They begin to lose their individuality and sense of Self, and adopt disgusting and weak, yet tantalizing, views of nihilism—they deem that life is meaningless, the void will consume all, and the wild, passionate flame of the Individual has been extinguished with no hope of coming to light again. In their eyes life is only, and will ever be, suffering.

Indeed, life is suffering. It’s full of poverty, sickness, sorrow, tyranny, and death. Yet we, the human race, prevail; we’ve been doing so for over a millennium. How? Through determination, willpower, and individuality. We steeled and fortified ourselves against the howling winds of extreme chaos and suffering. Through innovation, order, and freedom we established a foothold and prosperous society in the world. That is what these followers of nihilistic principles need to realize: yes, life is suffering, but it is your responsibility to find meaning in life. That meaning is found in being an individual, being determined, having willpower and by allowing human nature to run its course.

Discover and establish a balance of chaos and order in your life; be innovative, free, and find happiness. Allow your individuality to burn bright and run free, like a stallion running through a dew-filled prairie in the early morn. Fight against the endless suffering of life and defeat the dragons of evil.


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The Danger of the Modern View of Death

By Willie Johnson | USA

Today, the average lifespan in the United States is 79 years. Fifty years ago, it was 70. One hundred years ago, it wasn’t even 40. These stark differences can be attributed to a variety of factors such as disease, deaths in childbirth, and other dangers that have lessened over time, but the effects of a longer average lifespan go beyond just population numbers; The way society views aging and death has fundamentally changed.

It’s worth noting, however, that these generalizations usually only apply to the western worldparticularly the United States. Cultural differences around the world have made views on the subject unique from one country or region to the next, so specifying the ones being discussed is an important part of building an argument and avoiding sloppy writing. Knowing that it’s the modern, innovative components of American society that are responsible for lengthening lifespans helps in understanding the changes that are taking place.

Most people are familiar with the widespread system of senior homes and care facilities that have allowed the elderly to live out the final end of their lives in comfort without being a burden to their families. Although this is a generally positive thing, it has allowed people to view the decay of their loved ones intimately, something that rarely occurred in the days when most died not long past their prime. This has created an increased fear of aging, as we have found ways to extend lifespan without being able to delay the natural breakdown of our bodies. More than ever before, there is an emphasis on cosmetic improvement that ranges from harmless skin cream to dangerous plastic surgery procedures.

Celebrities are at the center of this issue; A half-century ago, for example, the average movie star either stopped making appearances after a certain point or died before old age altogether. They are as revered as much as ever today, but when people see their idols grow old and unattractive as they never did before, they come to hold such change in a negative light. The effects of popular culture on society cannot be overstated, and in this scenario, it has helped to shift associations with old age from wisdom and respect to death and decay.

Advances in medicine and technology, as stated before, have improved health and lengthened lifespan, but they have also bred fear. The more we are able to hold death at bay, the more we fear it. If our incredibly advanced life-saving techniquesthe product of thousands of years of innovationcan’t stop a friend or loved one from dying, it’s truly a power to contend with. Death has always been a part of existence, but rather than accepting it, we’ve come to rail against it as a society.

In times when Americans had a more close relationship with death (such as Colonial Times, the Civil War, etc), we accepted it with open arms as a gateway to the afterlife. Less fear and anxiety about death allows one to live a happier life. We’ve become less religious and more cynical, but the nihilistic view of dying that so many have adopted isn’t helping society in the least; If the prospects of aging and death prevents your enjoyment of life, you’re looking at them the wrong way.