Tag: pride

“Straight Pride” isn’t Offensive​, it’s Just Pointless

Ellie McFarland | @El_FarAwayLand

In August 2019, an organization called “Super Happy Fun America” will be hosting a “Straight Pride Parade” in Boston. One of the lead organizers, John Hugo says that his event is a commentary against “identity politics” he feels the LGBT community abuses. He and his supporters pat themselves on the back for their expert trolling of the libtards as media coverage swarms about their “offensive comedy”. However, what everyone is missing is that Hugo’s “trolling” is neither offensive nor funny. It’s meaningless, ill-informed, and pointless.

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Nationalism Hurts Young Men Today. Here’s How

By Kirk Classic | United States

There comes a time in every man’s life where he must come to define himself and make his way in the world, or risk being left behind and embittered. Often times I meet young men with little ambition, save for wealth, which is often concluded as the best alternative to defining the self. I then ask, “Do you want to be a man?” When the young man inevitably answers yes, I ask “What is a man?” Shrugs, a loss of eye contact, maybe even an awkward smile answer me. The one thing that never does is an answer.

How can boys hope to be something so ill-defined? Perhaps more concerning is the question of why it has a lost meaning? Unfortunately for so many young men today, their masculinity, interests and race is being attacked, making their struggle towards self-actualization an even steeper climb that it ought to be. It is during these times of startling uncertainly that the allure of nationalism looms the brightest.

In geography, a nation is a group with common descent, history, culture, or language in a territory. The word can overlap with a state, which is a group with common government and sovereignty, but it does not have to. Nationalism is when individuals drawn to the group identity of a common people seek to accrue power and advocate for said people, on the premise of superiority.

All too often, quite unfortunately, young men fall in love with the comfort of taking pride in their own heritage. Many times, the group is a supplement for the unremarkable achievements or lack of resolution of the individual who wishes to be unjustifiably fulfilled by a people long gone. How can you feel pride for the achievements of men you have never met, are loosely related to, and have no personal investment in? If you’ve ever called into question the paradoxical nature of race based reparations, this follows closely to that flawed mentality.

The nationalist, more or less, perceives the world like so. ‘The greatest architect known to man was a part of my tribe. He was the greatest architect because he was intelligent. Now, the architect’s achievements are an attribute. Therefore, as a descendant, I share these attributes. Thus, I feel pride.’

Pride is “a feeling of deep pleasure or satisfaction derived from one’s own achievements, the achievements of those with whom one is closely associated, or from qualities or possessions that are widely admired.” More simply put, pride is a feeling of satisfaction regarding an object of investment. Just as others feel a surrogate shame for the actions of people long dead, the nationalist feels pride for those whom he had no investment in.

Joseph Sobran noted in his 2001 column “Patriotism or Nationalism?” that, “In the same way, many Americans admire America for being strong, not for being American. For them, America has to be “the greatest country on earth” in order to be worthy of their devotion. If it were only the 2nd-greatest, or the 19th-greatest, or, heaven forbid, “a 3rd-rate power,” it would be virtually worthless.”

He then continues to state, “This is nationalism, not patriotism. Patriotism is like family love. You love your family just for being your family, not for being “the greatest family on earth” (whatever that might mean) or for being “better” than other families. You don’t feel threatened when other people love their families the same way. On the contrary, you respect their love, and you take comfort in knowing they respect yours. You don’t feel your family is enhanced by feuding with other families.”

As George Orwell astutely observed, “[there is a] habit of assuming that human beings can be classified like insects and that whole blocks of millions or tens of millions of people can be confidently labelled ‘good’ or ‘bad’. But secondly – and this is much more important – I mean the habit of identifying oneself with a single nation or other unit, placing it beyond good and evil and recognizing no other duty than that of advancing its interests.”

Steven Pinker, a cognitive psychologist and linguist, argues that by closing a dialogue and shunning dissenting thought, people will be more heavily drawn to opinions out of the ordinary that they seldom hear being represented truthfully. This creates an effect where the most alluring ideas are the most radical, because the radicals are hardest to silence.

If nationalism is created by the allure of a group identity, then it stands to reason that they do their part in destroying our individualist culture. There is danger in the path forward. The world works in equilibrium. Individuality and group identity are paramount forces. A lack of proper balance of the two can spell disaster.

Intellectual honesty is a war on two fronts. On one hand one must do battle with oneself. On the other hand, one must do battle with everything outside. It is a maddening process that has left greater men addled beyond belief. But, in the face of inevitable pockets of untruth, what is the alternative? Death in a society is sign of life, and though we know society will fall, in each of us is the fire that says “not today.” And as that fire roars and claims our flesh as fuel, let that fuel be so rich that it keeps warm those who will succeed us for generations.


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The True History of the Gadsden Flag

By Jack Parkos | United States

You’ve probably been to or have seen protests in your life. Many people have signs and flags to spread their message. One common occurrence at protests (typically protests held by libertarians or conservatives), is a yellow flag featuring a rattlesnake and the phrase “DON’T TREAD ON ME”. Many people have seen this flag but little know about it’s history and importance. This is the Gadsden Flag.

As stated above, the flag features a timber rattlesnake, the symbolism for using a snake being one of Ben Franklin’s many ingenious decisions.  Ben Franklin was known for his humorous satire. The British had been sending convicted criminals to the Americas. So in 1751, Ben Franklin suggested that, in return for this act, the colonists send rattlesnakes to Britain. The rattlesnake went on to feature in Franklin’s “Join or Die” cartoon. However, the design of the flag was not made by Franklin.

The name “Gadsden” comes from its designer, General Christopher Gadsden, general for the American Colonies as well as a delegate in the Continental Congress. This flag was later given to Eskes Hopkins, newly named Commander and Chief of the Continental Navy. Hopkins flew this flag on his first mission. Many Marines also used bright yellow drums, portraying the rattlesnake ready to strike, with the motto “DON’T TREAD ON ME”

Many other flags have been inspired from the Gadsden Flag. Several flags with similar meaning and history also feature a rattlesnake. The “Navy Jack” features a snake as well as the phrase “DON’T TREAD ON ME”. The snake, however, is not curled up and the background has the red and white stripes of the American flag. 

The deeper meaning of the rattlesnake is a symbol of early America. This is best explained by Ben Franklin.

I observed on one of the drums belonging to the marines now raising, there was painted a Rattle-Snake, with this modest motto under it, “Don’t tread on me.” As I know it is the custom to have some device on the arms of every country, I supposed this may have been intended for the arms of America; and as I have nothing to do with public affairs, and as my time is perfectly my own, in order to divert an idle hour, I sat down to guess what could have been intended by this uncommon device – I took care, however, to consult on this occasion a person who is acquainted with heraldry, from whom I learned, that it is a rule among the learned of that science “That the worthy properties of the animal, in the crest-born, shall be considered,” and, “That the base ones cannot have been intended;” he likewise informed me that the ancients considered the serpent as an emblem of wisdom, and in a certain attitude of endless duration – both which circumstances I suppose may have been had in view. Having gained this intelligence, and recollecting that countries are sometimes represented by animals peculiar to them, it occurred to me that the Rattle-Snake is found in no other quarter of the world besides America, and may therefore have been chosen, on that account, to represent her.

But then “the worldly properties” of a Snake I judged would be hard to point out. This rather raised than suppressed my curiosity, and having frequently seen the Rattle-Snake, I ran over in my mind every property by which she was distinguished, not only from other animals, but from those of the same genus or class of animals, endeavoring to fix some meaning to each, not wholly inconsistent with common sense.

I recollected that her eye excelled in brightness, that of any other animal, and that she has no eye-lids. She may therefore be esteemed an emblem of vigilance. She never begins an attack, nor, when once engaged, ever surrenders: She is therefore an emblem of magnanimity and true courage. As if anxious to prevent all pretensions of quarreling with her, the weapons with which nature has furnished her, she conceals in the roof of her mouth, so that, to those who are unacquainted with her, she appears to be a most defenseless animal; and even when those weapons are shown and extended for her defense, they appear weak and contemptible; but their wounds however small, are decisive and fatal. Conscious of this, she never wounds ’till she has generously given notice, even to her enemy, and cautioned him against the danger of treading on her.

Was I wrong, Sir, in thinking this a strong picture of the temper and conduct of America? The poison of her teeth is the necessary means of digesting her food, and at the same time is certain destruction to her enemies. This may be understood to intimate that those things which are destructive to our enemies, may be to us not only harmless, but absolutely necessary to our existence. I confess I was wholly at a loss what to make of the rattles, ’till I went back and counted them and found them just thirteen, exactly the number of the Colonies united in America; and I recollected too that this was the only part of the Snake which increased in numbers. Perhaps it might be only fancy, but, I conceited the painter had shown a half formed additional rattle, which, I suppose, may have been intended to represent the province of Canada.

‘Tis curious and amazing to observe how distinct and independent of each other the rattles of this animal are, and yet how firmly they are united together, so as never to be separated but by breaking them to pieces. One of those rattles singly, is incapable of producing sound, but the ringing of thirteen together, is sufficient to alarm the boldest man living.

The Rattle-Snake is solitary, and associates with her kind only when it is necessary for their preservation. In winter, the warmth of a number together will preserve their lives, while singly, they would probably perish. The power of fascination attributed to her, by a generous construction, may be understood to mean, that those who consider the liberty and blessings which America affords, and once come over to her, never afterwards leave her, but spend their lives with her. She strongly resembles America in this, that she is beautiful in youth and her beauty increaseth with her age, “her tongue also is blue and forked as the lightning, and her abode is among impenetrable rocks.”

This is flag has a deep meaning to early America. The phrase “Don’t tread on me” represents the rattle of a snake. When a snake rattles it serves as a warning to you to back off. Of course, the snake only engages when it feels threatened. This is the spirit of America. The warning to tyrants, not to tread on the people. What happens when you step on a snake? It will bite – quickly, with deadly force.

But the Gadsden flag still lives on. In modern-day, many libertarians have some form of this symbol. Many conservatives appreciate this flag, too. The flag also was the symbol of the “Tea Party Movement”.’ The flag also was presented in celebration after the death of Osama Bin Laden. Metallica even had a song “Don’t Tread on Me” to honor the flag. Some people consider this flag as important if not more important than the Star spangled Banner.

Yet sadly, in spite of this being a symbol of early America, the tyrants and progressives both want to destroy this flag. Do you own a flag? That may put you on a FBI watch list for being a suspected terrorist. The Gadsden Flag of early America – now considered a threat? But that’s not all – progressives want it banned for “hate speech”. Christopher Gadsden owned slaves. So, some assume that the flag must be associated with slavery. Ironically, it would be a great flag to protest slavery. Ultimately, it’s about American pride and standing up for liberty.

In conclusion, many may try to tread on the Gadsden flag, giving it false history and meaning. True patriots however, will fly this flag with pride. I personally display this symbol in many ways, and encourage you to do the same.


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