Tag: sexism

Men’s Issues: Forgotten victims

Peyton Gouzien | @PGouzien

Gender issues have been a mainstay of conversation in our society. This began in the early 1900s with the Women’s Suffrage movement, starting the “waves” of Feminism. Now we’ve reached the third wave of Feminism. They focus on the issues of sexual assault, sexual liberation, reproductive rights, and the gender pay gap. Critics of the wave feel it is possible the feminist movement has gone overboard in the quest for equality. Some will even argue they have already reached it. While on the other side Men’s issues rarely receive mainstream attention. Some in the Feminist movement will even view them as actually a women’s issue. This has caused a sense of disenfranchisement within men, leading to them forming their own organizations to solve their issues.

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Science Proves That Gender Differences Exist Before Birth

Romy Haber | @romyjournalist

“One is not born, but rather becomes, woman.” This is perhaps one of the most quoted lines from Simone de Beauvoir’s work; she is one of the first feminists to claim that gender is a social construct. Since then, the popularization of the “social construction of gender” has mushroomed.  Denying that gender is a product of culture can get you branded as “sexist” or “misogynistic.”

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5 Sexist Laws That Still Exist in the United States

Ryan Lau | @agorisms

For many years, women have fought for equal treatment, both at home and abroad. During many of their struggles, they faced considerable backlash for doing so. Now, in the eyes of many, the United States is a shining example of gender equality, at least in a legal sense. For the most part, a woman can do everything that a man can do. But unfortunately, there are still a number of areas in which the country does not provide women with equal rights. The following sexist laws still exist in parts of the country. Continue reading “5 Sexist Laws That Still Exist in the United States”

5 Sexist Laws That Still Exist in the United States

2. Married Women Need Permission for Haircuts

Many laws have existed regarding hair policy over the years. Over time, most have changed to represent the obvious freedom to get whatever haircut you choose. However, Michigan still has one particular sexist law on the books that solely targets married women.

In the state, a married woman must have her husband’s permission in order to get a haircut. Clearly, this represents past times of gender inequality. In modern times, this law does not see any real enforcement. Though it appears to still be on the books, hairdressers do not ever put it into practice. For this reason, one article stated that the very concept is now a myth. Though it may be a part of an antiquated law code, it does not tangibly affect women’s lives.

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The Gender Pay Gap is Perpetuated by Young Women Who Choose Low-Paying Jobs

By Jason Patterson | USA

The gender pay gap is by young female adults who choose jobs that pay less, a major study has found.

Even though teenage girls have a higher chance of attending a university, their male counterparts tend to major in professions with higher paying salaries, as the University College London (UCL)’s Institute for Education has shown in their latest study.

“Importance of recognizing the role of both boys’ and girls’ choices in perpetuating labor market inequalities” Professor Lucinda Platt, reported.

Shortly after she added that teenagers should be “encouraged and supported to think beyond gender roles and consider a range of future career options.”

Research has proven that girls thought they had a 71 percent chance of going to university, and 14 percent of girls were certain they would attend one.

On the other hand, with boys, the average expectation was 63 percent, and just under 10 percent were certain they would attend university.

They then asked what career aspirations the young people may have, and the average hourly wage for the occupations that girls aspired to was 27 percent lower than the boys.

Over 7,700 teenagers in the UK who are all part of the Millennium Cohort Study, a study which has followed their lives since they were born at the turn of the century.

When they were asked these questions at 14, the most popular jobs for both boys and girls included some highly-paid careers. However, the pay among the jobs girls aspired to was on average much lower.

In this study, they did not include the option of becoming a professional sports player due to the overwhelming majority wanting to play in the NFL and the NBA and according to the NCAA, only 1.7 percent of college football players and 0.08 percent of high school players play at any professional level. Only 1.3 percent of college hockey players and 0.1 percent of high school players play professionally. In basketball, only 1.2 percent of male and 0.9 percent of female college players play pro ball; for both, only 0.03 percent of high school players make it. And only 1 percent of college soccer players and 0.04 percent of high school players go pro.

Girls wanted to be either a medical profession, a secondary school teacher, a singer, the legal profession, a vet, a nurse or a midwife. For the boys, it was a professional sportsman, a software developer, an engineer, the army, or an architect.

Males and Females both favored jobs where the workforce was dominated by their own sex. Boys chose occupations with an average workforce that is 74 percent male, while girls chose jobs where women make up 59 percent of the workforce.

The final statements were by Dr. Sam Parsons, a co-author, saying he was surprised to find such “gendered differences” in young people’s aspirations. He said that “Despite aiming high academically and professionally, girls still appear to be aiming for less well-paid jobs.”