Tag: Sharpe

Larry Sharpe to be Featured on The Joe Rogan Experience

By Kenneth Casey | United States

Early Sunday morning, New York State Libertarian Party Gubernatorial candidate Larry Sharpe took to Twitter to announce they he will be a guest on The Joe Rogan Experience on September 5th, and that the event will be live-streamed from 6:00 EST to 7:30 EST.

If you’re unfamiliar with who Joe Rogan is, he is arguably the most prominent figure of Alternative Media and the host of the 4th most popular podcast on ITunes as of August 26th, which puts him ahead of The New York Times’ The Daily and ‘Oprah’s Master Class: The Podcast’.

He’s earned the reputation as an open-minded podcaster who’s willing to talk to any culturally relevant figure. He’s had discussions with prominent right-wing figures such as Ben Shapiro, Milo Yiannopoulos, Steven Crowder, and Jordan Peterson, as well as left-wing figures such as Bret Weinstein, Kyle Kulinski, Sam Harris and Cenk Uygur, just to name a few. He’s also had on some highly controversial figures like Alex Jones and Ted Nugent. Rogan offers something you just can’t get from mainstream media.

For Sharpe, this is a huge deal for his campaign. Rogan gets millions of downloads on every one of his podcasts, and I don’t think it’s far-fetched to argue he’s a more influential voice and reaches more people than anyone on radio or anyone in mainstream media. Sharpe has run an impeccable campaign which has lead him onto prominent shows such as The Rubin Report and Kennedy, as it’s very rare for a Libertarian Party candidate (or any third party candidate) to receive that type of media attention.

To listen to the podcast when it hits the air, subscribe to Joe Rogan’s YouTube Channel and turn on notifications to receive an immediate alert when it goes live. You can also download his podcasts on iTunes or your favorite podcast hosting site.


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Larry Sharpe Is Wrong-There Should Be No Compromise Between Baker and Gay Couple

Kaycee Ikeonu | United States

In an interview on the Rubin Report, talk-show host Dave Rubin, and Libertarian candidate for New York Governor Larry Sharpe discussed whether a baker should be compelled by law to bake a cake for a customer. The conversation sprung up due to the fact that Gary Johnson, a libertarian and good friend of Larry Sharpe, stated in his presidential candidacy that the baker should be forced to bake the cake.

Such a position, as one would assume, would be quite unpopular among libertarians and lovers of liberty. Larry Sharpe, however, insisted that Gary Johnson was misunderstood and went forth to give his case for why he thinks the baker should bake the cake. His argument is as follows:

“What he was trying to get at (addressing Gary Johnson), which is my policy, is to find a good, solid middle-ground. I do not want a baker to make a cake for someone who he doesn’t want to make a cake for. That’s his labor…that’s wrong, should never happen. Here is the good compromise: if a baker, or anyone creates a product and put it in to the retail market, whether that be online or a shelf on a store, if a person creates a product and puts it there, he must allow anyone who has the currency that he wants to purchase that product”.

In response to the arguments put forth by libertarians who believe that a business owner has the right to discriminate, Sharpe responded by saying:

“They are theoretically correct but realistically wrong. And if they don’t accept the compromise, they’re going to get worse… If you don’t take that first step you would get nothing—and just not nothing—those people who keep voting are going to keep voting our rights away.”

Prior to this statement, Mr. Sharpe alluded to past injustices faced by marginalized groups, thus, why he thought there ought to be a “compromise.” Moreover, Sharpe concluded that such clauses should only apply in retail, therefore, a customer cannot force a baker to bake a cake in a particular way outside the products that are on the shelves.

Among the multiple flaws in this argument, there are two specifically I would like to address: first, the fact that Mr. Sharpe uses past injustices as a levy for his argument in favor of government involvement in private businesses; second, how government involvement in private business, no matter how minute, would inevitably lead to the destruction of freedom in private enterprise.

In regards to the past injustices– and perhaps current injustices faced by some groups today– most reasonable people would acknowledge that such injustices are immoral, unfortunate and ought to be stopped as soon as possible. However, the problem arises when a duty is imposed on a third party who had nothing to do with the case, in an effort to correct for the past. Such line of reasoning has been used to justify affirmative action and quotas, all which seek to correct for past injustice by facilitating new injustices in our own times. Two wrongs don’t make a right. As Thomas Sowell put it:

“The past is a great unchangeable fact. Nothing is going to undo its sufferings and injustices, whatever their magnitude . . . . Neither the sins nor the sufferings of those now dead are within our power to change”.

Aside from Larry Sharpe’s references to past injustices, he specifies that compulsion to provide a service would only apply to retail, and only retail. A question that could be asked is what guarantees such confidence that bureaucrats would strictly adhere to those conditions? After all, it is very much in their interest to expand such laws. As James Buchanan said in his writings in Public Choice: Politicians, just like businessmen and independent individuals, have every incentive to pursue their own self-interest– which in this case would be to gain more power for themselves, create new legislation and expand current ones. Moreover, such a decision, to use the words of Scot Bixler, is just an “arbitrary decision”. Why interfere in retail and not customer service? Why a cake shop and not a hospital? If Larry Sharpe justifies the government making a minute compromise on this issue, then it follows that the government can interfere in every industry for the same reasons.

The role of government should be restricted to the protection of individual rights, and that only. If room is left for compromise, it would only lead to a slippery slope, one that we have today, of the government legislating every single aspects of our lives.


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Hanging Out With Larry Sharpe

By The Libertarian Curmudgeon | New York

Larry Sharpe, the Libertarian candidate for governor of New York, visited the Libertarian Party of Wisconsin Convention in Madison on Saturday, April 14, where he spoke to a real audience. But first, he granted a brief interview in the lobby.

It’s tough to stay curmudgeonly in the presence of Larry Sharpe, Libertarian Party candidate for governor of New York.

Sharpe is unremittingly optimistic, upbeat, positive – things that tend to irritate us curmudgeons, because they tend to be ill-fitting when a politician tries to wear them. You know, the twenty-minute stump speech about making America stronger together again, followed by backstage swearing at staff because the teleprompter was too dim or the podium too high, and then envelopes full of cash change hands to buy favors while bubbly young interns giggle and coo. The American people get left in the spin cycle of corruption and cronyism.

A ten-minute sit-down with candidate Sharpe at the Wisconsin Libertarian Party Convention in Madison soon turned to twenty, thirty and forty-five minutes. I witnessed no envelopes of cash or swearing at staff. No cooing interns. Sharpe is taking on Gov. Andrew Cuomo – a longshot by any calculation, considering Cuomo’s the incumbent, the Democrat in a state with a 2-1 Democratic majority and a $30 million campaign war chest.

Sharpe says his campaign has raised more money than all other candidates combined other than Cuomo, including two Republicans. The longshot isn’t as distant as it once was. Or maybe that’s just Mr. Sharpe’s optimism rubbing off.

How does a third-party candidate depose King Cuomo?

Plurality vote with multiple candidates

“Win more votes than anyone else,” Sharpe says. “New York is a plurality winner. I don’t need a majority. I only need about 25 percent to win this race.” Assuming the same 4-million- voter turnout as 2014, with four or five candidates on the ballot and an irrelevant New York Republican Party, a million votes could win this thing. Enter Cynthia Nixon of Sex and the City fame. Because celebrities as government leaders have been so
successful.

“Nixon getting in the race is great for us.” Sharpe was downright exuberant over the prospects. “She will damage Cuomo for us in the primary and split the liberal and progressive voters.” And Cuomo may have to waste some of the war chest to fend off Miranda’s attack from his left flank. Nixon was endorsed by the Working Families Party, a far-left party that often endorses the Democratic Party nominee, including Cuomo last time. Not this year. Nixon could be on the general election ballot even if Cuomo defeats her in the Democratic primary. That could peel a substantial number of votes away from Cuomo.

Multi-party ticket

Another step higher on this uphill battle is the possibility of a fusion ticket. If Sharpe receives the endorsement of another party or two, his name could appear on the ballot multiple times, increasing visibility and the number of potential voters. Possible fusion tickets include the Reform Party and the Upstate Jobs Party.

Downsides to fusion tickets?

“It can water down the message,” Sharpe says, “but that’s not a problem for me because I never change my message. If I get another party’s endorsement, it’s because they like my message, not because I tailor my message to each party.”

From a Libertarian Party perspective, it gets trickier. “A fusion ticket can complicate ballot access. If the Libertarian Party candidate gets 50,000 votes on the Libertarian ballot line, that guarantees the party ballot access for the next four years. If people are voting for me on three different lines, that ballot access vote gets split up among the parties.”

A growing base plus niche voters

In 2014, the Libertarian candidate for governor, Michael McDermott, pulled down a whopping 17,000 votes, 0.4 percent of the total. Cuomo receive two million votes. Even if Nixon splits the Democratic vote, how does Sharpe gather a million-plus to make this a horse race?

“Gary Johnson received 175,000 votes in New York for president in 2016. That’s my base. That’s where I start.”

From there, Sharpe tackles the niche, one-issue voters no one else is pays attention to.

“Vaping. These businesses and users don’t want crushing regulation. They don’t care what else I stand for if I support the issue that’s important to them.” Okay, so there’s a couple thousand more voters. Sharpe then rattles off a few more niche voters that should support his candidacy. Single dads crushed by unfair family law. Drivers licenses revoked in perpetuity for a third DUI conviction, preventing people who have served their time and paid their dues from ever driving again in any state, which often means unemployment in perpetuity. And Utica, where abuse of eminent domain will destroy thirty businesses to make way for a hospital.

“I don’t have to change my message for any of these groups,” Sharpe says. “Break the state mandates. Return local control to local governments and away from Albany.”

The city versus upstate

Sure, some of Sharpe’s message will play well in Utica, Syracuse, Rochester, and the vast expanses of rural upstate. But no one wins statewide without the city.

“Education is a statewide issue.” Sharpe makes the point that New York spends more on education than any other state with the worst results. “People in Queens care about their children’s education as much as people in Rochester. And right now, we’re failing because of state mandates. That’s an issue that bridges the divide.”

Gun control?

“There’s no winning the city with that issue.” Sharpe opposes New York’s SAFE Act, the most stringent gun control regulations in the country. He obviously doesn’t change his message to win over different voting blocs. “The SAFE Act may sound great, but it actually does more harm than good. Overnight, law-abiding citizens became criminals with the stroke of a pen.”

Sharpe has pledged to repeal the SAFE Act and pardon those who became overnight criminals.

Three keys to electoral success

Even with all that optimism and a fresh approach to state government, can a third-party candidate knock off a sitting governor from the dominant political party? Won’t it take more than a celebrity activist syphoning off some lefties and picking up the support of the vaping industry?

Sharpe listed three key turning points:

  1. Corruption. “Scandals are swirling around Cuomo and many of his key people. If one of these scandals sticks to him… voters are fed up with the corruption.”
  2. Media. “It can take a while before the statewide mainstream media start to take notice, but it’s happening at the local media level now. I’ll stop at a restaurant with twenty people, and there will be representatives from four different media outlets there. As fundraising grows, local media builds, and the momentum increases, the big media will be there.”
  3. Debate. “The top four or five candidates will debate. Cuomo will participate, and that’s where I will stand out among the crowd.”

Are the odds long?

Absolutely. Nixon, a fusion ticket, a scandal on the incumbent, a million or so voters
fed up with the Status Cuomo, and some pissed-off vapers. Combine that perfect storm with a genuine, articulate believer in people, a Marine veteran, a successful business executive and leadership guru, and New York could lead the way to liberty.


Full disclosure: This interview was facilitated by Sharpe’s communications director, who happens to be my daughter.

The Libertarian Curmudgeon, aka Robb Grindstaff, is a fiction writer, editor, and newspaper executive.

He’s lived in Phoenix, small towns in North Carolina and Texas, Washington, D.C. (also known as Fresh Hell), and five years in Tokyo, Japan.

He now resides in Wisconsin on a few acres out in the country where the only things he ever yells at to get off his lawn are possums, deer, and wild turkeys.

His critically acclaimed and modestly selling novel, Hannah’s Voice, has been called the best libertarian novel since Atlas Shrugged. Full disclosure: That was also his daughter who said that.

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2018: A Breakout Year for Libertarians Like Larry Sharpe?

By Ryan Lau | UNITED STATES

Throughout the 2016 election season, many political pundits speculated about the impact Gary Johnson may have on the Libertarian Party. Much of this discussion centered around goal results of 5% nationally, which would give the party major party status. However, Johnson fell short of these numbers, ultimately receiving a mere 3.3% of votes. Though some may consider this to be a failure, it appears that this is simply not the truth. Several states, most notably New Mexico, have drastically increased the number of Libertarian candidates that will be on the 2018 ballot. Despite the Land of Enchantment’s clear successes, one isolated Libertarian campaign may blow this success out of the water.

Larry Sharpe for Governor

In the grand state of New York, former Marine and businessman Larry Sharpe is taking action. With a legion of volunteers, he believes will soon exceed 1,000 people, his grassroots campaign shows more promise than, arguably, any other third party campaign. Although election day is still nine months away, Sharpe’s campaign already is making waves. With high hopes, he and his campaign are well on their way to an upset of Governor Andrew Cuomo.

Clearly, a Sharpe victory will be unprecedented, if it does occur. In fact, every Governor of New York since the Civil War has either been a Republican or a Democrat. Sharpe, however, fails to let this stat discourage him from pouring his heart into the campaign. In the filing period of the last six months, he raised an astonishing $102,596, according to a Politico report. Though this falls far short of Cuomo’s fundraising, it is far ahead of any Republican fundraising efforts. In fact, no declared Republican candidate has raised more than $16,026 thus far. Thus, despite Sharpe’s third-party status, he has proven himself capable of collecting large sums of money.

Sharpe’s Social Spike

In just one short year, with the release of his seven-year plan for the Libertarian Party, among other suggestions for party improvements, Sharpe has risen from just another Libertarian to one of the top members of an essentially leaderless party. With Ron Paul and Judge Andrew Napolitano prohibited from speaking at the party convention, many hope he may fill this void. Though this may be a way off, some recent occurrences confirm his rapid rise in popularity.

For the first time in decades, major news sources are reporting on a third party candidate. Just last week, the previously cited Politico report ran a major story about Sharpe’s successes. Reason Magazine also recently interviewed the ex-Marine in regards to his campaign, and many other, smaller news sources have begun to take interest in the candidate. Alexa search engine results also show www.larrysharpe.com increasing in popularity by over one million ranks in three months. In addition to recent media notices, Sharpe believes there are a number of other fields in which he can dominate Cuomo during the campaign.

A Competitive Advantage

Despite finishing in only second place in fundraising, Sharpe sees a number of opportunities to outperform his opponents. Most notably, this includes debate performances and social media. Sharpe has stated recently that he believes Cuomo to be “not a very good debater”, and considers himself more adept. A recording of his 2016 Vice Presidential primary debate is available here.

On social media presence, he also believes that he will be superior. Though Cuomo’s Facebook page has considerably more followers than Sharpe’s (around 129,000 compared to 41,000), Cuomo has already run a successful campaign, and he amassed many of his followers during that period, as well as during his term as governor. Sharpe, a political newcomer, shows potential to considerably grow this number. He describes Cuomo as “a dire soul when it comes to social media” and believes he will dominate this field.

How Likely is a Sharpe Victory?

Is a victory ultimately possible? Though his odds are fairly slim, an eventual win is not impossible. In the Politico report referenced above, Sharpe sounded hopeful in regards to his eventual victory. “Only about 4 million New Yorkers are going to vote”, the candidate assured last week. Based on this logic, a victory would entail the candidate receiving a minimum of just under 1.5 million votes.

In the 2016 election, Libertarian Presidential candidate Gary Johnson won 176,598 votes. For Sharpe to win his race, he would need to amass eight times as many votes as Johnson, when only a little over half of the number of people will likely be voting. Though this is no easy task, his impressive earnings thus far, as well as his potential to shine in debates and social media, may lead to a better than expected showing on Election Day.

What can you Do?

Currently, Larry Sharpe is seeking help in a number of ways. Of course, one way to assist the campaign is to make a donation. However, for those who cannot donate, or have already, there are a number of other ways to help. His campaign team is looking for volunteers to aid in phone banking, social media work, research, photography, door knocking, and several other areas. Anyone who would like to aid the campaign may sign up here.