Tag: supreme court

Candace Owens Supports a Flag Over the Constitution

Jack Parkos | @laissez_faire76

On Saturday, President Trump created a new controversy when he tweeted that it was a “no brainer” to have an amendment that would ban the burning of the American flag.

However, the situation got heated when conservative activist Candace Owens tweeted that she believed flag burning warrants a loss of citizenship.

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Supreme Court Upholds Precedent Allowing Double Jeopardy

Othman J. Mekhloufi | @othmanmekhloufi

On the morning of Monday, June 17th, the Supreme Court of the United States reached a decision— in the case Gamble v. United States — that allows an individual to be charged and tried in state and federal court for the same crime, citing that state and federal governments are “separate sovereigns”. The ruling was reached 7-2 with only Justices Neil Gorsuch and Ruth Bader Ginsburg in dissent. Essentially, an individual may be tried twice for the same crime, a legal proceeding deemed “Double Jeopardy”.

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Like All Things, Technology Could Solve Gerrymandering

Jack Shields | @Jack_Shields20

With the 2020 election approaching fast, many Americans are thinking about how they will vote at the polls. This election cycle consists of intense interest, most of which is well deserved. The election will be a hotly contested one. Many dislike the Trump administration but can’t seem to find a replacement for him outside of the Democratic Party. However, the Presidential election should not block out another important issue: the reallocating of the 435 Congressional seats in the House of Representatives between the fifty states and the subsequent redistricting of said seats.

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The Constitutional Case to Overturn Roe v Wade

Jack Parkos | @laissez_faire76

In December of 1973, the Supreme Court made one of its most controversial (and worst) rulings, Roe v Wade. It declared that the Constitution protects abortion; therefore, the states could not pass restrictions on it. However, states could pass laws to limit abortions in the third trimester.

Despite this, Republicans in numerous states have recently passed laws with very strict restrictions on abortion. Clearly, this is an attempt to get a lawsuit and with it, a case to the Supreme Court. Hopefully, this will lead to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v Wade, once more leaving the issue to the states.

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How Should We Feel About The Alabama Abortion Law

Warren Albrecht | United States

I believe a good discussion may start in negative and positive rights. A negative right does not enforce the duty on someone else. Duty is usually thought of as an entitlement. A positive right has an entitlement owed. Everybody has a negative right to engage in commerce or trade. But everyone does not have the positive right to impose a duty or force someone else to engage in commerce with you and trade with you.

This is where most libertarians discuss the benefit of free trade. It must be consensual. People in free trade have a contract. I give you three apples and you give me a rope. To have a positive right, someone must have a duty to fulfill for you. The example most widely discussed is the public defender. If you do not have an attorney, one will be provided for you. This means it imposes a duty on someone else to provide and pay for that attorney. The universal agreement is required for a positive right.

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