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Seattle’s New Soda Tax is an Attack on the Free-Market

Seattle’s soft drink tax is just another example of how the government is becoming more and more a part of every aspect of our lives.

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By Emily Merrell | USA

In democrat run city of Seattle Washington, the lawmakers are being taught a lesson on how the free market will always give us freedom and how unfair it is to control the citizens. Seattle thought they could pass a soda-tax on its citizens, doubling the price of sugary/soft drinks. The state believed that the tax would make citizens become more healthy, making them stray away from sugary drinks due to the price.

“To make sure that we not only impact norms and behaviors for folks in term of choice and consumption but that we also invest in food access programs, education and early-learning efforts throughout Seattle,” Seattle Council Member Teresa said. Seattle is literally trying to control the lifestyles of their citizens. She also mentioned that “One of the most important outcomes that we’re interested in studying is how children sugary beverage intake changes in response to the tax,”

Costco sells items in bulk and challenged this tax by putting signs showing how much money was taxed in the total cost comparing it to Costco’s retail cost:

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Costco even informed customers with signs of where they can buy drinks at other locations outside of the city of Seattle. Seattle’s goal was to plummet sales and negatively affect businesses selling the drinks.

The Cato Institute pointed out this twitter thread by tax reformist Scott Drenkard:

  • “First they interview people at the Costco who are rightfully shocked at how high prices on soda and sports drinks are now (they are almost doubled).”
  • “Then they interview a public health advocate who says ‘that’s right! We want these prices to change people’s behavior and slow sales!’”
  • “Then they talk to the consumer, ‘think you’ll change your behavior, maybe even shop somewhere else?’ And she’s like, ‘ya the Tukwila store is close enough.’ Then they ask a city council member if this will hurt local biz, who says ‘there is no data’ suggesting that.”
  • “Then the SAME public health advocate says that people won’t respond to price increases, shopping elsewhere because it isn’t ‘worth their while.’”
  • “You can’t have it both ways, people! The tax is either big enough to elicit behavior change, which would slow sales and hurt local biz and potentially reduce calories, or it isn’t. Get your stories straight!”

Shopping will be driven out of the city of Seattle due to the fact that people are going outside the perimeter to buy drinks. Might as well buy everything else outside. Businesses will be suffering and Seattle will need to eventually abolish the tax, it’s just a matter of the free market until then.

Seattle’s soft drink tax is just another example of how the government is becoming more and more a part of every aspect of our lives. From fishing licenses to teeth brushing regulations for children at a daycare in Massachusetts. The list is endless and just keeps adding on. Let the free market do its thing and let citizens do what they want. Period. We cannot let this happen.

 

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