The Pentagon is Asking Congress for Money to Fund the Taliban

Mason Mohon | @mohonofficial

The United States Federal Government and Pentagon are still funding terrorists. The U.S. has a long history of terrorist financing, but it has gone on for so long that it has just become an accepted fact in the American unconscious. Those engaging in political discourse often see such allegations as mere conspiracy theories. Recently, though, the Pentagon asked Congress for money so they can pay for Taliban travel expenses.

The Pentagon Funding the Taliban

In an interview with the spokesman for the chairman of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense, Roll Call discovered what the Pentagon was doing. Earlier this year, the Trump administration asked for funding so that they can fund Taliban travel expenses. In addition, they also aim to fund Taliban lodging, food, and supplies. The spokesman, Kevin Spicer, said:

The Defense Department requested fiscal 2020 funding to support certain reconciliation activities, including logistic support for members of the Taliban and, in March 2019, they sent a notification letter to the Committee on using fiscal year 2019 funds for similar activities.

Spicer continued that funding from the U.S. for the Taliban “would implicate provisions of law concerning material support to terrorists, the Taliban’s ongoing offensive operations against U.S. service members, and their continuing lack of acknowledgment of the government of Afghanistan or the rights of women in Afghan society.”

On Wednesday, though, the subcommittee approved legislation that would prohibit funneling money to the Taliban.

U.S. Sponsored Terrorism

This is not the only instance of the U.S. and Pentagon funding terrorism, though. The United States foreign policy harbors a long tradition of complicated strategies that somehow often include giving money to terrorists.

During the 1980s the U.S. funded the Contras in their war against the Nicaraguan government. During this time, the Contras carried out over 1300 terrorist attacks. The U.S. continued to fund them in spite of multiple recorded cases of abuse regarding human rights.

In addition, the U.S government is responsible for backing Cuban exiles turned terrorists. After the 1959 Cuban revolution, many skilled individuals were left without purpose. The CIA funded Orlando Bosch, a Cuban exile responsible for bombing a plane in 1976. He worked in tandem for an ex-CIA agent. Bosch is also responsible for over 30 other terrorist acts.

The United States trend of funding those who wish to do harm is long and needs to end. Foreign policy is often convoluted, so policymakers engage in more convoluted strategies. The result, though, is almost always more enemies for America and more terrorist groups to fight (or fund).

Tulsi Gabbard, who is seeking the Democratic nomination in the 2020 election, recognizes this as a problem. She came out against state-sponsoring of terrorism and called for the U.S. to end its involvement. Hopefully, more lawmakers will realize that such action is disgusting and needs to be curtailed. A more peaceful and less alarming foreign policy will always be beneficial in the long-run.


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